OH MY HIPS

//OH MY HIPS

OH MY HIPS

 

Hips!

 

 

Does your back, knee, feet hurt? Are you having any issues south of the border? Hehe (sorry couldn’t help it). Well, of course seek out professional advice and don’t ignore pain or increasing issues but . . .those pesky hips could be the issue. Came across and article that says

“our hips can be the “quiet” cause of our low back pain, or even knee or foot pain. First of all, long and strong hip muscles, such as the Rectus Femoris, Iliotibial Band, and Psoas Major can easily become tight and cause biomechanical pain elsewhere in the body.”  BUT what does all of that really mean?!?!?!?!

 

The hips are a ball and socket joint, allowing for movement in multiple planes of motion (flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, circumduction) or (forward, back, side to side, and having rotation). The ability to move the joint freely within the hip socket is vital to squatting  – repeat – vital to squatting. You squat way more than you may think and it isn’t with weight. Hello toilet? Can I get up and down from easily? If not . ..time work on that hip mobility. It’s that simple people . . .this is about the long term ability to do the most basic tasks and to just squat heavy weight if that is your thing.

 

Our bodies are a kinetic chain and while each part has it’s function when one is off . ..you need to look at the whole to see where and why pain or lack of mobility may be happening. If you we are looking at hips then also need to look at our pelvic stabilization and strength. (abs for days)

 

Exercises can help strengthen the hip external rotators, improving stability and preventing injuries in the hips, knees, and ankles. Strong hip external rotators can also reduce knee pain and lower back pain.

Some things you can do to help are

Exercises can help strengthen the hip external rotators, improving stability and preventing injuries in the hips, knees, and ankles. Strong hip external rotators can also reduce knee pain and lower back pain.

Some things you can do to help are:

 

Clamshell

  •         Lie on your left side with your legs stacked. Bend your knees to an angle of approximately 45 degrees. Check to make sure your hips are stacked one on top of the other.
  •         Use your left arm to prop up your head. Use your right arm to stabilize your upper body by placing your right hand on your right hip.
  •         Keeping your feet together, move your right knee upward as high as you can, opening your legs. Engage your abdominals by tucking in your belly button. Make sure your pelvis and hips don’t move.
  •         Pause with your right knee lifted, then return your right leg to the starting position.
  •         Repeat 20 to 30 times.
  •         Do the same on your right side.

 

Lying-on-stomach hip external rotation

  •         Lie down on your stomach with both legs extended. Place your palms flat on the floor under your chin. Rest your chin or either cheek on your hands.
  •         Keep your left leg extended. Bend your right knee at an angle just less than 90 degrees, bringing the leg toward your torso. Rest the inside of your right ankle on your left calf.
  •         Gently lift your right knee off the floor. You should feel your external hip muscles activate. Lower your right knee to the ground.
  •         Repeat 20 to 30 times, and then switch legs.

 

Fire hydrants

  •         Begin this exercise on your hands and knees with your back straight. Draw in your belly button to engage your abdominal muscles.
  •         Keeping your right leg bent at 90 degrees, lift your right knee out to the right and up, away from your body, opening your right hip. Hold this position briefly. Return your right knee to the floor.
  •         Repeat this movement 10 to 20 times, ensuring your elbows remain locked.
  •         Complete the same number of reps on the other side.

Seated 90-90

  •         Start from a seated position on the floor with feet flat on the floor, knees bent and shoulder width apart.
  •         Keeping your right leg bent, rotate it down and to the right so that the exterior of this leg touches the floor.
  •         Adjust the position so that your right thigh extends forward from your body and your right calf is at a 90-degree angle to your right thigh.
  •         Keeping your left leg bent, rotate it down and to the right so that the interior of this leg touches the floor.
  •         Adjust the position so that your left thigh extends to the left of your body and your left calf is at a 90-degree angle to your left thigh. Your right thigh should be parallel to your left calf. Your right calf should be parallel to your left thigh. Check out this video to see how your legs should be positioned.
  •         Keep your spine straight and your sitz bones pressed into the floor. Then gently lean forward, placing your hands on your right calf or the floor beyond it.
  •         Hold for about 30 seconds, then release and do the same on the other side.

Give your body time…time to improve…time to heal…and time to get strong.
Faster is not always better…BETTER IS BETTER

2019-04-08T11:03:19+00:00